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Registration Count Approaches 1200, Financial Aid Closing Soon

As of this morning, the registration count is a just short of 1200, putting us very close to halfway sold out. However, if you want to go to PyCon, don’t plan on waiting too long. We typically see two surges in ticket sales: right after the holidays, and right after the schedule is announced. Guess what’s happening soon? The holidays and the schedule announcement.


The list of selected talks was announced a few weeks ago, so check it out. We’ve got talks by the perennial favorites Alex Martelli and Raymond Hettinger and many newcomers. The list features a diverse list of topics and presenters, with many familiar faces and many breaking onto the scene. The selections came from over 450 proposals, and given the excellent quality of proposals we received, we could have made two or three entire conferences out of the submissions. It’s really going to be a great three days of talks.

The tutorials are already scheduled and can be added to any existing registrations by logging into your account on the site and choosing to add a tutorial. This year we’re happy to have a group of returning presenters joining several first-timers for another great year of tutorials. David Beazley is back again with two courses that are sure to bring out his favorite word (diabolical), and Jessica McKellar is sharing her outreach and contribution experience in two great offerings. As with years past, the selections are taught by a range of instructors, from full-time educators to domain experts, all chosen with topics that will benefit the community.

If you’re paying your own way to PyCon, don’t forget that December 31, 2012 is the last day to submit applications for financial aid. This year’s budget was expanded early on, then it was recently doubled, in an effort to make sure this PyCon can help bring as many people to the conference as possible. We offer assistance for tickets, travel, and hotel, and are working in conjunction with the PyLadies group on a special grant for women. Don’t wait, apply today!


Be on the lookout for more PyCon news!

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